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Gentle illumination
28 November 2011
Museums place very special requirements on lighting as, for reasons of preservation, the precious exhibits need to be handled with extra care. Special filters in the luminaires have to ensure that no harmful UV or IR rays will potentially damage or bleach the paintings. As early as 2008, Zumtobel joined forces with architect David Chipperfield to design the "Arcos" spotlight line, which is tailored precisely to suit these needs. One important aspect when applying light in museums and at exhibitions is that it does not produce a glare. A screen integrated in the "Arcos" spotlight design helps prevent those irritating reflections. If required, a cruciform louver attachment can be placed before the illuminant or a lamp tube, a black metal ring, integrated in the reflector, which makes it impossible to look directly at the lamp. Whether in Dresden's Albertinum or in the Herning Museum of Contemporary Art in Denmark – whatever needs to be illuminated, thanks to their comprehensive range of optics/models, these spotlights can direct and concentrate light in countless different ways.

www.zumtobel.com
- Ceiling detail of the 'heart' (Herning Museum of Contemporary Art) museum in Herning, Denmark, with illustrations of the Arcos spots by Zumtobel | photo © Iwan Baan
'heart' Museum | Photo © Iwan Baan
In the exhibition warehouse of the “Albertinum” museum in Dresden visitors can marvel at invaluable torsos and sculptures. The room is kept very dark, and the Arcos spots create gleaming highlights.
The Albertinum inner courtyard in Dresden with its new roof. Arcos spotlights are concealed in the black seam.
Arcos Detail: Downlights
The architect David Chipperfield on the design of the Arcos family for Zumtobel
'heart' Museum | Foto © Thomas Mayer
The Klingersaal at the Albertinum in Dresden is a listed building and, with its Classical columns and dark red wall decorations brings the fin de siècle to mind. Using special filters, the Arcos spotlights create illumination that meets rigorous conservational standards
The museum spotlights are installed on phase power tracks and integrated optimally into the bright and very simple spatial concept. The precision with which the spotlights deliver light ensure that each painting is accentuated in just the right way.
Arcos Detail: Wallwasher
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Architecture › 2011 › November
Gentle illumination
28 November 2011
Museums place very special requirements on lighting as, for reasons of preservation, the precious exhibits need to be handled with extra care. Special filters in the luminaires have to ensure that no harmful UV or IR rays will potentially damage or bleach the paintings. As early as 2008, Zumtobel joined forces with architect David Chipperfield to design the "Arcos" spotlight line, which is tailored precisely to suit these needs. One important aspect when applying light in museums and at exhibitions is that it does not produce a glare. A screen integrated in the "Arcos" spotlight design helps prevent those irritating reflections. If required, a cruciform louver attachment can be placed before the illuminant or a lamp tube, a black metal ring, integrated in the reflector, which makes it impossible to look directly at the lamp. Whether in Dresden's Albertinum or in the Herning Museum of Contemporary Art in Denmark – whatever needs to be illuminated, thanks to their comprehensive range of optics/models, these spotlights can direct and concentrate light in countless different ways.

www.zumtobel.com