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Renovation of Berlin’s Tränenpalast
6/13/2012

The Friedrichstraße train station was the last stop before the nefarious border separating East and West Berlin. Designed by architect Horst Lüderitz, a glass pavilion was erected here in 1961 as a border control terminal. The emotional goodbyes that took place at the border crossing soon led the people to dub it the “Tränenpalast” (Palace of Tears).

In September 2011, the permanent exhibition “Border Experiences – Everyday Life in Divided Germany” was opened there, elaborating on this recent period of Germany’s past. The building was renovated for the occasion, among other things, the glass façade. Architectural firm Bollinger und Fehling was awarded the contract for the project. They were charged with the task of maintaining the building’s unique character and the slightly uneven structure of the panels that made up the glass façades, typical for 1960s production methods.

The TIKANA® restoration glass manufactured by glass specialist Schott fulfilled the requirements set out by the authority for the protection of monuments. The panels are six millimeters thick and 2794 millimeters tall, though standard TIKANA® panels are four millimeters thick and 2400 millimeters tall.

For the renovation of Berlin’s Tränenpalast, Architects Bollinger + Fehling had glass specialist Schott produce their restoration glass, TIKANA®, with four different angles, photo © Schott AG
For the renovation of Berlin’s Tränenpalast, Architects Bollinger + Fehling had glass specialist Schott produce their restoration glass, TIKANA®, with four different angles, photo © Schott AG
The glass panels contain a special lighting technology, which prevents the space beneath them heating up in direct sunlight, photo © Schott AG
The steel frame construction that bears the glazed façade stands on a 2.50-meter-high base, photo © Schott AG
TIKANA® restoration glass by Schott references the uneven structures of those glass panels typical of 1960s production methods, photo © Schott AG
The exhibition “Border Experiences – Everyday Life in Divided Germany” has been open to the public since September 2011, photo © Schott AG
During the renovation project, architectural firm Bollinger + Fehling succeeded in preserving the building’s original character, photo © Schott AG

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