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The impressive rooms were designed by interior designers Anaïs Torfs and Michiel Mertens alias "Going East".
Photo: Jeroen Verrecht © Fosbury & Sons
The impressive rooms were designed by interior designers Anaïs Torfs and Michiel Mertens alias "Going East".

Work aesthetically

Workstations that look like lounges in boutique hotels with practical services: “Boitsfort” is the name of the latest serviced office designed by Fosbury & Sons. The founders Stijn Geeraets and Maarten Van Gool believe their concept is the answer to the traditional office.
by Bettina Krause | 12/13/2018

“We want to do justice to the current generation’s needs,” explains Maarten Van Gool. And adds: “Today, staff members and freelancers don’t want some grey office environment. From us they get a professional work station and meaningful services into the bargain, exciting lectures, professional advice, activities. The range includes a library, healthy food, sports hours, and a whole lot more besides.” Co-working spaces are popping up all over the place, work is becoming ever more mobile and flexible, and the expectations of work stations rising fast. One key demand: aesthetic, stylishly designed spaces. Recently opened in Brussels, the “Boitsfort” is installed in an iconic building designed by Constantin Brodzki. The former head office of cement makers CBR is a striking, brutalist building. The 756 convex windows in their oval concrete modules and the façade’s parallel lines transform the nine-story building into a veritable monolith. “The character of the building, its history, its extraordinary architecture, the zeitgeist when it was erected – it was a perfect fit. On top of which, it’s also super-functional,” enthuses Stijn Geeraets.

"We want to meet the needs of the current generation," explains Maarten Van Gool of Fosbury & Sons.
Photo: Jeroen Verrecht © Fosbury & Sons
"We want to meet the needs of the current generation," explains Maarten Van Gool of Fosbury & Sons.

The new space takes up 7,000 square meters and straddles seven of the nine floors. Alongside the private office spaces, the so-called “suites”, and the “studios” (shared office spaces), there are zones for shared use. The lobby (complete with a bar), a restaurant, the bar on the 8th floor with its panorama view, and the meeting rooms and auditorium are open to all. The service is geared to businesspeople, digital nomads as well as small and large corporations – and aesthetes. As the impressive rooms are the brainchild of interior designers Anaïs Torfs and Michiel Mertens alias “Going East”. There is hardly any use of color, and the coarse character of the concrete walls has been preserved. The uniform design of the flooring and furniture (such as chairs and tables) made of bright woods, along with the plants and the colorful sofas, form a warm, high-quality contrast to the concrete. The additional highlights: Thanks to collaboration with Brussels galleries and artists there are not only a few extravagant luminaires but a lot of art on display in the rooms. The office of tomorrow will certainly be an inspiring place offering a pleasant atmosphere in which to work and network productively. Fosbury & Sons wants its members to actually have the feeling that they have “come home” – all their efforts thus focus on the users well-being.

The former headquarters of the cement company CBR in Brussels is a striking, brutalistic building by Constantin Brodzki.
Photo: Jeroen Verrecht © Fosbury & Sons
The former headquarters of the cement company CBR in Brussels is a striking, brutalistic building by Constantin Brodzki.
756 convex windows in oval concrete modules and the parallel lines of the façade lend the nine-storey building a monolithic atmosphere.
Photo: Jeroen Verrecht © Fosbury & Sons
756 convex windows in oval concrete modules and the parallel lines of the façade lend the nine-storey building a monolithic atmosphere.
The new space extends over 7000 square meters on seven of the nine floors of the building.
Photo: Jeroen Verrecht © Fosbury & Sons
The new space extends over 7000 square meters on seven of the nine floors of the building.
In addition to the private office spaces called "suites" and the "studios", i.e. the divided office spaces, there are areas that can be used jointly.
Photo: Jeroen Verrecht © Fosbury & Sons
In addition to the private office spaces called "suites" and the "studios", i.e. the divided office spaces, there are areas that can be used jointly.
In addition to the private office spaces called "suites" and the "studios", i.e. the divided private office spaces, there are areas that can be used jointly.
Photo: Jeroen Verrecht © Fosbury & Sons
In addition to the private office spaces called "suites" and the "studios", i.e. the divided private office spaces, there are areas that can be used jointly.
The floors and furniture made of light wood, as well as plants and sofas in light tones, form a warm, elegant contrast to the concrete in a uniform design.
Photo: Jeroen Verrecht © Fosbury & Sons
The floors and furniture made of light wood, as well as plants and sofas in light tones, form a warm, elegant contrast to the concrete in a uniform design.
The Co-Working Space "Boitsfort" is set in an iconic building designed by Constantin Brodzki.
Photo: Jeroen Verrecht © Fosbury & Sons
The Co-Working Space "Boitsfort" is set in an iconic building designed by Constantin Brodzki.
The office of the future is about creating inspiring places that create a pleasant, productive atmosphere for working and networking.
Photo: Jeroen Verrecht © Fosbury & Sons
The office of the future is about creating inspiring places that create a pleasant, productive atmosphere for working and networking.
Fosbury & Sons wants to give its members a sense of "coming home" - well-being is at the heart of their efforts.
Photo: Jeroen Verrecht © Fosbury & Sons
Fosbury & Sons wants to give its members a sense of "coming home" - well-being is at the heart of their efforts.

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