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Photo: Koji Fujii, Takeshi Hosaka

Microliving
Less is more

The architect Takeshi Hosaka has built a 19 square metre home in Tokyo, which, like a sacred building, stands for frugality.
by Anna Moldenhauer | 6/9/2019

A 19 square metre property in Tokyo, narrowly enclosed between three houses: That offers just enough space for a car, you might think. For architect Takeshi Hosaka, there was enough space for his new home. The reinforced concrete construction of the single-storey "Love2House" stretches upwards between the adjoining buildings and closes with roof curves made of galvanized aluminum plates. Seven partitions and a narrow staircase divide the interior living areas. Hosaka has solved the lack of daylight with a glazed front. In addition, the curved roof curves leave two skylights free through which the sunlight can fall deep into the room.

With a kitchen, an open dining area, plenty of storage space and zones for privacy, the small house offers all the functions that the Hosaka couple need in everyday life. The access to the ground floor of the house can be opened wide via a sliding door - a move that, despite its minimal size, makes the living space appear open and bright even from the outside and promotes spontaneous communication with the neighbourhood. The architect found inspiration for the reduction to the essentials in the philosophical teachings of epicureism that emerged in the 4th century BC. Accordingly, the long-term achievement of inner peace is possible through frugality and a life in harmony with nature.

Photo: Koji Fujii, Takeshi Hosaka
Photo: Koji Fujii, Takeshi Hosaka
Photo: Koji Fujii, Takeshi Hosaka
Photo: Koji Fujii, Takeshi Hosaka
Photo: Koji Fujii, Takeshi Hosaka
Photo: Takeshi Hosaka