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Melons made of cork
Melons made of cork
by Nina Reetzke | 06 July 2012

At young Italian label “Discipline” the focus is on creating furniture using simple shapes and natural materials. Lars Beller was moved by wrack found on the beach when designing a stool for them, while Sarah Illenberger cut up a bunch of fruit and vegetables for the label’s first campaign.

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Out of love for materials
Out of love for materials
04 July 2012

For “design publisher” Thomas Eyck craftsmanship translates into the utmost care in the use of materials. Juliane Grützner spoke to the Dutchman about his collection of hand-crafted objects.

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We’re always moving
We’re always moving
02 July 2012

Why should someone design a tilting chair like “Tip Ton”? Nina Reetzke asked Edward Barber about his personal viewpoint on statics and dynamics.

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Wooden novelties
Wooden novelties
by Nina Reetzke | 29 June 2012

Nicola Stattmann is considered an expert on new materials and technologies. In a joint venture with her brother she is now presenting “Stattmann Neue Möbel” and in doing so takes her family’s joinery into its fourth generation. The first designs illustrate that there are still a great deal of opportunities for development innate in reputedly traditional wooden furniture.

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The experience of nostalgia: Craftsmanship has a future
The experience of nostalgia: Craftsmanship has a future
by Thomas Wagner | 27 June 2012

Craftsmanship – is it a thing of the past? Not at all. More and more frequently we see designers and manufacturers making recourse to traditional technical know-how and craftsmanship. And not only when it comes to luxury products.

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Lasting Values
Lasting Values
by Jörg Zimmermann | 25 June 2012

The “Metropole Aluminum House” by Jean Prouvé was the big attraction at the seventh Design Miami Basel and the trade fair continues to be a fixed date in the diaries of vintage design collectors and admirers of classic design icons alike.

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Constellations: Rietveld and the revolution of space – part 2
Constellations: Rietveld and the revolution of space – part 2
by Thomas Wagner | 22 June 2012

Architecture for Rietveld is spatial art. The Rietveld Schröder House in Utrecht is not the only example of open-space constructions by Rietveld that foster a new lifestyle.

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Witnesses to violence
Witnesses to violence
by Sandra Hofmeister | 18 June 2012

Should architecture serve power, provide a visual representation of it? How do we read traces of destruction that scar the urban space? An ambitious reader by Bechir Kenzari on the relationship between architecture and violence seeks to answer precisely such questions.

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Nodes: Rietveld and the revolution of space – part 1
Nodes: Rietveld and the revolution of space –
part 1
by Thomas Wagner | 18 June 2012

Gerrit Rietveld is one of the best-known Modernist designers and architects. However, his oeuvre is not just of historical interest. A visit to the exhibition at Vitra Design Museum in Weil am Rhein shows how Rietveld addresses space, and proves himself to be highly topical.

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Breathing a sigh of relief – behind the blinds
Breathing a sigh of relief – behind the blinds
by Milenka Thomas | 15 June 2012

In the form of “JOH3”, J. Mayer H. Architects have completed their first construction project in Berlin. The apartment block is clad in aluminum blinds and has a curved silhouette – offering a new interpretation of the Berlin tenement block.

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Observations in space and time
Observations in space and time
by Jörg Zimmermann | 13 June 2012

Documenta 13 has begun. For 100 days, Kassel will host the work of over 150 artists, scientists and philosophers from 55 countries. A photographic tour offers a first impression of the works.

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+++ NEWSTICKER #239 | 2012 +++
+++ NEWSTICKER #239 | 2012 +++
12 June 2012

Zaha Hadid: High-rises
Hamburg: Lost Places
Basel: Art and design
Munich: L’Architecture Engagée
3sat: Konstantin Grcic


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Paola’s world
Paola’s world
by Sandra Hofmeister | 11 June 2012

Paola Antonelli is a design critic and curator at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Untiring in her enthusiasm, she tells the world why design as part of everyday culture has earned a permanent place in the MoMA.

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Near-perfect living
Near-perfect living
by Jörg Zimmermann | 08 June 2012

What attitude do the Germans have toward their homes? This is an interesting question, which sociologist Alphons Silbermann pursued in his 1989 study “Neues vom Wohnen der Deutschen”. It is now to be updated with “Deutschland privat”, which has shown many German homes to be in almost perfect condition. Leo Lübke, the commissioner of the study, is delighted at the Germans’ affirmation of furniture as a cultural asset.

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Forging a new world
Forging a new world
by Thomas Edelmann | 06 June 2012

Ingo Maurer, Enzo Mari, Eero Aarnio – they all belong to a group of designers who were born in 1932 and by tenaciously advancing their own ideas have succeeded in creating sensational works. A consideration of the 1932 designers.

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+++ NEWSTICKER #238 | 2012 +++
+++ NEWSTICKER #238 | 2012 +++
05 June 2012

Zurich: The Swiss Touch
Berlin: DMY 2012
New York: Art of Another Kind
Kassel: Documenta 13
Munich: Image Counter Image


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Sharp as a needle
Sharp as a needle
by Annette Tietenberg | 04 June 2012

British photographer and author Alex MacNaughton goes out into the urban jungle and tracks down people marked by life and asks them to reveal their skin to him. They proudly present the images on their skin and tell him their stories too.

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Moving in higher spheres
Moving in higher spheres
by Nina Reetzke | 01 June 2012

She was born and grew up near-by, and then studied architecture. So who else could be better suited than Jolanthe Kugler to write an architectural guide to the Goetheanum hill. She manages to offer a systematic overview of the 170-odd houses in the Anthroposophical Colony, but in the process neglects to give greater depth to the specifics of the individual buildings.

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